I have been an internet student of Paige for some time now. Our cooperation started when I sent her a video of me and my horse working together in the moment of great despair of mine. I desperately needed "tools" and guidance. I did not believe I can learn riding via internet but I hoped to gain better understanding of what my horse does. I was so wrong. It is possible to learn to ride and have a successfull partnership with your horse having internet guidance of such a proffesional. So as everyone can imagine I was struggling alone and frequently showed her "what we did" on videos. Sometimes a description of mine was enough. Paige has many gifts. She does understand horses well but the clue when teaching people to ride is to understand human part of equation. She does it very well knowing exactly what to say in the right moments. By this she helps getting out of dead ends, calming down both: the horse and the rider. Her great knowledge in horse biomechanics is not something that she shows off with. Instead it is gently used by her to explain why my mare does what she does, what conditions are needed to change it, and possible ways of approach are suggested. When I frequently turned to her with a vent "my mare and I will never get this!"...I would hear a suprising answer like for eg. "they don't know until they know" which immediately would calm me down and made me ready to start again with my horse. She loves human and horses equally and believes in them. She believed in my mare before I did...giving me strength to go on. Because you should never give up on your horse. And this is one of her gifts, either solution or thorough explanation (which with all the complicated biomechanics knowledge is presented by her in easily understandable way). With this you never feel left alone. And that is how I feel having Paige as my teacher, as if she was with me.

My mare's progress is Paige's success because she kept me going and trying. She has great understanding of dressage movements knowing how to properly prepare a horse for a demand of it.  Jumping is her specialty as well. When it turned out my mare thinks she can't canter, Paige again came up with a surprising solution of trying small jumps which were executed on a lunge line at first since I know nothing about jumping. Plus I was afraid to do it anyway. A thorough explanation came from Paige of how to properly prepare for the jump itself and believe me, it was a clue to not let my horse jump in an uncoordinated manner. The mare frustrated a lot on bad landings. Suddenly, me who never jumped, was teaching my horse to jump. What came next surprised me. When I explained to Paige my difficulties with preparing the approach to jump with the lunge line technique and said "I should be probably doing this from a saddle"...but I was afraid....she presented it the way I was able to agree with and not resist anymore. The written advice was simple and sounded safe. I could not refuse that. With all the instructions we successfully went through my first jumping lesson. The process continues, but today my mare is a different horse, thanks to this wonderful and wise woman. Thank you Paige.

Lucyna E., California

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This video is to introduce the lunging technique we use. It is not intended to be used without our guidance. It is important that we see how the horse is responding to this because like any technique or gymnastic, if the horse's coordination is not right, it can do more harm than good. The technique is DeCarpentry's method updated by Cornille. It is particularly useful in rehabilitation where we need to be very careful to encourage the horse to explore a healthy coordination. The horse has to learn it and we need the horse's brain to process. This system allows guidance but not control and that is the intention. Knowledge of biomechanics enables the analysis necessary to make decisions about how to proceed.