The term tracking up refers to the hind hoof landing in or ahead of the front hoof print. It’s often considered good, however there is more to consider.  If the front hoof is leaving the ground near an imaginary line dropped from the middle of the horse’s belly, it is being overloaded, it is staying on the ground - loaded - for too long. (For horses with more upright or short pasterns, overloading can occur even if the foot does not appear to stay on the ground too long.) Furthermore, it is interfering with the synchronization of the hind limb joints causing asynchronous joint rotation. If the front hoof is leaving the ground nearer to an imaginary line dropped from the girth area, then there may be no overloading, however if the pelvis is not rotating enough dorsoventrally, there will be undue stress on any combination of the lumbar region, stifles, hocks and SIJ. The one that takes the brunt of the abuse flares up first. Creating lift and flexion of the thoracic region can alleviate these problems but is only one ingredient.